Marketing LR to a viewer

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Marketing LR to a viewer

Post by Fauxfyre on Sat Feb 28, 2015 3:23 am

So, as some of you may have noticed, I released a scenery track lately. I quickly noticed a comment that kept coming up when showing it to my non-LR friends & family: "Wow, that is so awesome, I would never have the patience or artistic skill to make that". Then I recalled that I was receiving this same feedback on Silent Flame Scened, and even some bare tracks I've shown in the past (even my release from last Summer, Phoenix, something that took me less than 2 weeks!)....

The point I want to get at here is how AT LEAST 80% of the active players now are so far ahead of the baseline starting point that, to a stranger of the LR community, seems unattainable. I haven't yet heard somebody say they didn't like a track I showed them, but neither have I heard them mention that they wanted to try it out for themselves. I just always hear the same thing over and over, that people don't believe they can get to that point themselves, and in the end don't even bother trying. I know for a fact Dap gets a few Facebook comments on his tracks, or other tracks he posts, but I don't know of any of his friends that have even been bothered to come here.

I want to hear the community's opinion on why it is so rare for us to get new users? I mean seriously, we've had probably a good 3 trackmakers join us in the last full year? If our tracks are so well received, what are we doing wrong that isn't drawing in at least one new person every couple months? Not that I'm saying I expect everyone who likes a track to come to WRTL forever, but I would think we could at least see a new user submit at least one track every now and then.

More than that though, I think it would be worthwhile to brainstorm some things that can be changed to make the game seem more welcoming to an unskilled player. I'll suggest some ideas later when I have them together, but something I think that can be started with is:

Is Line Rider accessible enough right now? Is it too hard to start a track and follow all the way up through to uploading it on the web? Are we getting people who play the game, but can't be bothered to go through the process of recording/editing for a simple track? Or do you think LR just is too much work to get started in the first place, having to teach yourself how to do what you just watched someone else do on a track?

Fauxfyre
Member

Featured Video: Blackheart

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Marketing LR to a viewer

Post by Helios Pavonine on Sat Feb 28, 2015 8:50 am

The market in itself has changed. Little physics-based flash games were quite popular 8-9 years ago, but since then Steam and mobile games have seen a huge rise in popularity. Now let it be the case that LR is featured on neither of these platforms :P after linerider.com shut down, we've been stuck on this site as a 'platform' for a while. When people search 'Line Rider' on Google, WRTL doesn't even show up on the first 3 pages (for me, atleast). In recent years, there has been little effort to adapt LR to new trends.

On top of that, the modern quirk era certainly hasn't had a positive impact on how people outside LR view the game: "I could never do that", " too much spare time?". Now that, perhaps finally, the postmodern age has kicked in I hope we can attract a broader audience and thus receive more members. But in order to do that, we need to market the game not as a little physics toy but as an art medium. In that respect, LR falls short in its accessibility. It takes way too long to make a decent scenery track with mouse and keyboard. It's an inefficient way for one to express himself. LR Online is promising in that it tries to solve this problem in a few ways, but I fear for how it'll be marketed.

How can we make LR fresh and new again? What would be our target audience? It's interesting to brainstorm about all this.

_________________
What's it going to be then, eh?

Back to top Go down

Re: Marketing LR to a viewer

Post by ScrungleBlumpkus on Sat Feb 28, 2015 9:22 am

I've not read HP's post yet, but in response to yours: The baseline requirements to be considered "good" in this game are absurdly high quality. I had to take a year of sole technical practice before I ever got "good." I'm quite an active facebook user and I pertain to the interests of quite a following, just becuase it's fun for me, and when I post a track people definitely comment (not just IRTL people) and often I get "This must've taken you decades! How'd you do that? He's not even  touching some of the lines! What a tripfest."

The difference between "How'd you do that?" and "Can I do that?" is astounding.

I actually didn't discover LR on my own; a friend of mine, Kevin Carpenter, was a computer geek in the neighborhood I used to live in, and since I always looked up to him for that, when he started telling me about LR, I wanted to try first. He was a manualer. I quickly learned to XY and to quirk, and he lost interest. I didn't need him to stay motivated because I had already gotten into the community itself, whereas he had not. I left for other reasons, but I was only able to come back becasue of the draw of a community and because of the very specific type of personality required for a person to want to develop skills at this game over a period of time longer than a few weeks...or a few days, even.

I messaged old Kevin and showed him Photon one day after it came out. He said "So THIS is what you've been working on all these years?!"

                     There was no joke in that message. He actually expected that it would take a millenium to make anything that substantial. The last 40 seconds of Photon happened in 5 days.

I explained to him a lot of that and he said "You must've gotten really good. How much have you played over the years?"
                 When I told him twice that I had been playing less than 7 months up to that point, he refused to believe me. He actually linked somethign by KW (surprise surprise) and said, "This dude (idk if you know about him [LEL]) has been playing since the start and he barely has a leg up on you. Neh, Ian, just neh."

We've become unbelievable at this point.

Let me just put two more cents down: I convinced him to, in his spare time away from MineCraft competitions and TF2 training (a gamer, indeed!) and writing his latest and greatest (developer <3), try it out. Get back inro LR, maybe. He said he can't promise anything but he said he'd try. He even sent me a screenshot of him working on tiny bits of quirk and a screen recording of some manuals he clarified had been made that day. I was excited and left him alone to blossom!
                                 I messaged him a week later and he didn't respond. I messaged him again 2 more weeks after that and said "Don't let not doing this suddenly giv eyou reason to break our friendship and stop talking. It's important to ME, not to you. And that's okay."
                             Since then, we've been chattin' away as always.

My point is that people don't generally have passion for this game anymore. And another thing about it is that if it's already been done, even if it's YOUR first time doing something, nobody gives half a  @#!*%  about that. Which  @#!*%  me off on Photon's release. It might go a long way to realize how far-fetched it is that anybody returned at all after being gone so long. It's unrealistic of me to expect, I realized, that Kevin should suddenly also find LR as enjoyable as it is to me and as it once was to us many years ago.


2 cents

_________________
Don't delete your tracks!™  Thumbs Up
avatar
ScrungleBlumpkus
Member

Interior Crocodile Alligator


View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Marketing LR to a viewer

Post by rabid squirrel on Sat Feb 28, 2015 10:23 am

Well, for my part, I try to:

1) never make anything that involves an insane amount of technical skill, unless the vision demands it (and in that case, procrastinate it for a long time xD)

2) Make material that is accessible and enjoyable by anyone, regardless of whether they've ever even touched this game

3) Give reviews that review primarily not the technical elements but more of the overall scope and core ideas

4) Try to make material that doesn't look impossible for anyone to make. Or at least not AS impossible. I know I don't have a lot of artistic drawing talent or quirk ability, but that combined with a massive knowledge of line rider history gives me the power to appeal to a wider audience and also the community at the same time

5) Push as many community collaborations as possible to levels of quality, and also to completion, despite a lot of apathy surrounding them, because they invite others to participate.

_________________
Support My Art
A playlist of my best tracks
To keep up with what I'm up to in the world of Line Rider, follow me:
My Twitter | My Tumblr | My Twitch | My Facebook Page | My Instagram
(You can also follow my patreon and see all public posts completely for free)
avatar
rabid squirrel
Member

I'm the artsy guy round here

Community Pick: Braggadocio
3rd place in Tournament of Legends 4th place in Tournament of Legends

View user profile http://www.benjaminharveydesign.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: Marketing LR to a viewer

Post by Lukking on Sat Feb 28, 2015 12:55 pm

@Helios Pavonine wrote: It's an inefficient way for one to express himself.
So true.
I think LR has no/no direct rewarding system like LVL ups or Points or armor or.....

Things like drawings or paintings also dont have that but that type of art is just around for a much longer time. I dont think marketing LR as an art medium will be successful because of what hp said. For us passionate LR players it might be the case but newer players (at least thats the case for me) want to learn all the "tricks" like flings. Leading them towards these with "minigames" would be a good option imo. The reason why i think LR is less popular than minecraft for example is that LR is far too minimalistic.
If there was a raking system and/or a highscore-like system (which is limiting LR in so many ways) i think more players could be kept playing.

Also: Recording/editing has to be as little work as possible.

Edit: maybe we could look at similar games/things/artforms and see how they are marketed.
Edit: What if there are a number of "good" players available new players can choose to "coach" or "teach" them?

_________________

@Cereal wrote:I have a strange feeling like you'll make tracks again sometime (since that's what happens to 95% of people who quit like this), but I could be wrong.

You were right.
avatar
Lukking
Member

Community Pick: SYTYKC
4th place in Tournament of Legends

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Marketing LR to a viewer

Post by rabid squirrel on Sat Feb 28, 2015 6:15 pm

@Lukking wrote:we could look at similar games/things/artforms and see how they are marketed.
free rider http://www.freeriderhd.com/

there are many tracks in free rider that are "autos" aka "hold the up key the whole time" aka basically line rider

_________________
Support My Art
A playlist of my best tracks
To keep up with what I'm up to in the world of Line Rider, follow me:
My Twitter | My Tumblr | My Twitch | My Facebook Page | My Instagram
(You can also follow my patreon and see all public posts completely for free)
avatar
rabid squirrel
Member

I'm the artsy guy round here

Community Pick: Braggadocio
3rd place in Tournament of Legends 4th place in Tournament of Legends

View user profile http://www.benjaminharveydesign.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: Marketing LR to a viewer

Post by Lukking on Sat Feb 28, 2015 6:41 pm

But the "problem" is that we want LR to be something different than free rider. Which it probably is.

How about we ask that same question on a marketing forum?

_________________

@Cereal wrote:I have a strange feeling like you'll make tracks again sometime (since that's what happens to 95% of people who quit like this), but I could be wrong.

You were right.
avatar
Lukking
Member

Community Pick: SYTYKC
4th place in Tournament of Legends

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Marketing LR to a viewer

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum